Bougainville News : President Momis concerned about PNG PM O’Neill’s ill-informed and misleading referendum comments

 

Bougainville President Chief Dr John Momis says he is extremely concerned that comments from Prime Minister O’Neil raising doubts about the referendum will produce only suspicion and doubt about his intentions to follow the Bougainville Peace Agreement.

“The Prime Minister’s comments on the floor of National Parliament about the conditions for the Bougainville referendum going ahead are wrong,” President Momis said.

“Weapons disposal and good governance are not conditions or criteria for stopping the referendum, they are simply conditions for setting the date – something we both agreed last year should be 15 June 2019 as a target date, but it must be held before 15 June 2020 according to the Peace Agreement.”

Watch video HERE

“The Prime Minister’s statement is dangerous – it can mislead people.”
President Momis assured his people that the Bougainville referendum will go ahead – and that the target date remains 15 June, 2019.

“My message to all Bougainvilleans is that the Peace Agreement is clear, the referendum will go ahead.

“To all those who have been working hard on getting rid of weapons, setting up a well-functioning Autonomous Bougainville Government, cleaning up public service – please continue your good work, your work will secure a peaceful and prosperous future for Bougainville.”

President Momis said Members of Parliament are closely involved in getting their communities weapons-free and people referendum ready – and that they were doing this without funding or assistance from the National Government.

“In fact the National Government, through its lack of grant payment is actually hampering and not assisting our drive towards good governance. They have dismally failed to give Bougainville what is due under the Constitution to us – we have not been asking for any more or any less.”

President Momis instead emphasised the need for continued and close collaboration that the Peace Agreement was founded on.

“The BPA is joint creation, to be implemented with integrity by both governments, so that the referendum outcome also has integrity and is mutually accepted.

“These statements are either irresponsible or ill-informed. But these sorts of statements are dangerous – it suggests to people that maybe the National Government does not want to collaborate with us and implement the Peace Agreement.

“On our side, we will continue to stick to the BPA, we will get rid of the guns, clean up the government and get ourselves prepared for foreign investment to help grow our economy to develop our resources.

We must move quickly to explain things to the Prime Minister, to brief him properly – so that he doesn’t create suspicions and instead increase the necessary collaboration leading up to and beyond the referendum vote.

The best way to once and for all resolve the Bougainville crisis is to work together, spend monies as per the Peace Agreement, and link more than a decade of peace with much needed economic development and effective government service provision.”

Hon. Chief Dr. John L Momis, GCL, MHR
President, Autonomous Bougainville Government

Bougainville independence referendum ‘may not be possible’ with key conditions not met: PNG PM

Papua New Guinea Prime Minister Peter O’Neill has cast doubt on whether an independence referendum will go ahead for the autonomous region of Bougainville because key conditions have not been met.

Part of the peace agreement that ended a decade-long secessionist conflict between Bougainville and Papua New Guinea was the proposal to hold a referendum on independence before 2020.

Bougainville needs to meet certain criteria before the referendum can be held, Mr O’Neill told PNG’s Parliament.

“That includes a proper establishment of rule of law, proper establishment of a government structure on Bougainville, proper disposal of weapons — so all those issues are yet to be met, Mr Speaker, as we speak today,” he said.

“I don’t want Papua New Guineans and Bougainvilleans to think that it’s an easy path, that we’ll just wake up tomorrow and have a referendum.

“It may be such that it’s not possible.”

Bougainville electoral commissioner George Manu and PNG electoral commissioner Patilias Gamato.

Mr O’Neill told MPs the PNG Government would help Bougainville resolve the problems, but did not give details.

“We need to work between now and then to work harder in making sure that we attend to the issues that are clearly defined and stated in the peace agreement,” he said.

“I want to assure the [Autonomous Bougainville Government] and the people of Bougainville that we are there to work with them in resolving these issues.”

In January, the PNG and Bougainville governments set up a commission to prepare for the referendum, but did not give it any funding at the time.

The Bougainville Government wants to restart a controversial copper mine, blamed for triggering the conflict to provide revenue for an independent state, but faces some local opposition.

Bougainville News : Inter-parliamentary dialogue

THE World is a better place when its constituent populations get together regularly as equals to discuss important issues and learn from each other’s mistakes and successes.

Parliaments of the Commonwealth certainly do this through the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association (CPA), when they meet on matters of common regional and global concern.

By Simon Pentanu Parliament House Buka

The CPA has a long history that contains many worthwhile achievements. Among these, the Commonwealth significant role in the long struggle to stamp out apartheid, the release of Nelson Mandela and the eventual emergence of multi-racial South Africa under Mandela.

As well, matters of topical political and parliamentary interest, global challenges like climate change, the plunder of the world’s oceans, pollution, food security, the rights and plight of children, election fraud and money laundering are among the range of issues discussed when members of the CPA meet. That many Commonwealth Parliaments now have strong laws against money laundering is thanks in part to the CPA’s dialogue on how to address this wicked global problem

PNG and AROB are, separately and together, equal parliamentary partners in the CPA. PNG and Bougainville’s ability to enact their own laws on matters of regional concern is enhanced by their membership of the CPA’s regional and global bodies.

In a recent meeting following the official opening of PNG’s Tenth Parliament on 22 August 2017, the Speakers of the National Parliament and the Bougainville House of Representatives pledged to forge closer, meaningful ties through exchange and reciprocal visits of members and parliamentary staff of their two Parliaments. Inter-parliamentary relationships like this already exist between and among many Parliaments in the Pacific region.

It is worth remembering that the Oceania region presents a real example of peace and stability when compared to many other parts of the world where wars are being fought or where threats of war, including nuclear annihilation, are used as threats between nations.

We have something we can justifiably show the world. The PNG National Parliament and the Bougainville House of Representatives, together with the National Government and ABG, can hold up the Bougainville Peace Agreement as a success story, by and large, to the Commonwealth and to members of the international community when they converge on PNG for the APEC meeting in November 2018 – the first time APEC will be hosted by a Pacific nation.

The onus is on Bougainville to successfully implement the Bougainville Peace Agreement. But the National Government must be just as concerned as the ABG to see the outcomes of the agreement are managed as best and as successfully and amicably as possible.

Coming to a shared understanding will be easier if we spend more time with each other and seek to understand the issues we are each grappling with. Reciprocal visits between our two Parliaments provide appropriate forums for our MPs and MHRs to engage in healthy exchanges, formally and informally, and gain new insights about the political requirements of their respective Parliaments.

In much the same way the involvement of our respective Parliaments in international and regional forums and associations can enhance the quality of dialogue between our elected leaders in Buka and Port Moresby. Let us not forget: the ratification of Bougainville’s Referendum vote will ultimately be a decision for the members of the PNG National Parliament.

So it is important all Papua New Guinea’s elected MPs – whether they are from the islands, the highlands or elsewhere – have some knowledge of Bougainville’s particular circumstances and understand how regional and national dilemmas are worked out in other parts of the Commonwealth and elsewhere where similar conflicts have had to be negotiated.

With all this in mind, I am heartened to hear the Prime Minister say PNG’s new Parliament will be open to debate and discuss a wide range of local issues as well as matters of regional and global interest.

Bougainville still elects four MPs to the National Parliament. In the current Parliament one of the MPs – the new member for Central Bougainville – is a Minister in the Government.

Perhaps more than MPs from other parts of the country, Bougainville parliamentarians should take the PM’s statement to heart and seek to forge and promote a more expansive and meaningful dialogue with the Government and their colleagues on the preparations for Referendum, which both Governments and Members of both Parliaments are expected to deliver on.

Only then will both our Parliaments be playing their leadership and institutional roles as the highest accountable bodies in the land, according to the Westminster system.

We are at a juncture when we need clear thinkers in the NEC and BEC to understand and appreciate the importance and enormity of the tasks and responsibilities that face both Governments and the People of Bougainville counting down to the agreed target date for the Referendum on 15 June 2019.

Likewise, it should take the collective wisdom of our 111 members of the National Parliament and 41 members of the  Bougainville House of Representatives to address ourselves to the values, motivations and aspirations that bond humanity together.

Our membership as politicians in our respective Parliaments is a relationship that we should cultivate in and expect to get better and meaningful dialogue from in exerting our leadership roles as we will be called upon to exercise foresight, forbearance, respect and understanding as time draws nearer to the Referendum target date barely two years away.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bougainville Peace and Referendum News : 16 years since the Bougainville Peace Agreement was signed, what are the next steps

 

” The Bougainville Peace Agreement intends to “Promote and pursue meaningful reconciliation. Weapons disposal and reconciliation are both mutually reinforcing and necessary to lasting peace by peaceful means.”

Bougainville Peace Agreement, 2001. Did you know you can read the Bougainville Peace Agreement online?

Go to http://www.abg.gov.pg/peace-agreement to read this foundational document.

August 30 marked sixteen years since the Bougainville Peace Agreement was signed, ushering in a new era of peace and unity amongst Bougainvilleans and with the rest of Papua New Guinea.

What is the next step ? Referendum

The Governor General of Papua New Guinea his excellency SIR BOB DADAE today signed the REFERENDUM CHARTER for Bougainville in Port Moresby.

The Charter now paves the way for Bougainville to speed up its preparation the REFERENDUM that the two Governments had set a target date to work towards.
AND the target date is JUNE 15th 2019.

This was announced by the Secretary for the Referendum Office, MR. JAMES TANIS in Buka today.

MR. TANIS announced during the gathering in Buka that the Governor General has signed the Charter at 2 PM this afternoon.

He said that Bougainville needs to celebrate another history in the walk for Peace and Unification throughout Bougainville.

It has been 16 years since the signing of an important blue print document that put an end to the island’s civil war. Reported  here

The Bougainville Peace Agreement paved the way for lasting peace on the war torn island of Bougainville, following the post conflict which erupted from disputes over the Panguna Mine.

On August 30, 2001, the Bougainville Peace Agreement was signed in Arawa, Central Bougainville.

The agreement between the Government of the Independent State of Papua New Guinea and the Autonomous Bougainville Government.

It was intended to further objectives of The Burnham Truce, Lincoln and Ceasefire Agreements and other agreements and understanding between both parties.

It was aimed to be implemented through consultation and co-operation.

Three pillars of autonomy, referendum and weapons disposal were set as guidelines for the referendum conduct in 2019.

Several Government delegations from mainland Papua New Guinea visited Bougainville to restore the government’s trust and confidence to the people.

Among them was Papua New Guinea’s former Prime Minister, Bill Skate, who favourably went to simply request hard liners and war loads to surrender their weapons.

And that was documented in the Ceasefire Agreement.

Women were at the forefront, negotiating for peace.

The Peace Monitoring Group comprising of Australia, New Zealand, Vanuatu and Fiji were deployed into Bougainville in 1998, and monitored the peace agreement, reported on ceasefire violations, and supported the peace process and also involved in the weapon disposal programs.

They withdraw their mission in 2000 in a ceremony at the Independence Oval in Arawa.

The signing of the Bougainville Peace Agreement in 2001, allowed for the establishment of the Autonomous Bougainville Government in 2005,with Joseph Kabui, elected as the first president of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville.

It’s a win-win solution and since 2005, the full implementation of the peace accord, has never been realised.

One of the major issues was with the grants owed to Bougainville by the National Government.

Chief John Momis, since elected as president in 2010, he has been very vocal on matters concerning Bougainville especially the grants.

In 2014, Prime Minister, Peter O’Neill paid a goodwill visit to the Autonomous Region of Bougainville.

But the Joint Supervisory Meeting is another aspect that gives value to the Bougainville Peace Agreement.

Since May last years, there has been no meeting as yet.

The new Bougainville Affairs Minister and Central Bougainville MP, Fr Simon Dumarinu said the JSB Meeting will be a priority and should be the first agenda, as the deadline looms.

Meanwhile President, Momis reminded Bougainvilleans that the signing of this important blue print document, paved the way for lasting peace on the island, following the post conflict on the island.

300817BANAM TELLS HOW LEITANA DEMANDED FOR AUTONOMY
By Aloysius Laukai

The former Chairman of the LEITANA COUNCIL OF ELDERS during the negotiation days before the signing of the Bougainville Peace Agreement in 2001, JOEL BANAM says that LEITANA opted for Autonomy instead of the Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) Declared by FRANCIS ONA in 1990 in Arawa.

He made these remarks when speaking to the women of Bougainville who gathered in Buka today to commemorate the Signing of the Bougainville Peace Agreement in 2001.

MR. BANAM said that LEITANA wanted to make sure Bougainville goes with AUTONOMY to prepare Bougainville for the Independence after the Referendum.

He said LEITANA wanted to make sure Bougainville was united and removed guns and also raised its own funds to run the new nation.

MR. BANAM said that they saw that going straight to Independence would result in more deaths and non-stop fighting that could destroy Bougainville further.

Meanwhile, the former Vice President for the Bougainville People’s Congress at the time of the negotiations and now the Secretary for the Referendum office and former President JAMES TANIS confirmed comments made earlier by MR. JOEL BANAM.

MR. TANIS said that the LEITANA COUNCIL OF ELDERS was needed to make sure Bougainville leaders were united and speak as one when negotiating with the National Government.

The celebrations continued with extra items as more women registered items to perform.
The items included String Bands, Choirs, Jimmy Shand Music and discos.

This was the second such celebration since the Bougainville Peace Agreement was signed on August 30th, 2001.

The first celebration was held in 2011 when the UN Officers from New York and PNG came to Buka to commemorate ten years since the Bougainville Peace Agreement was signed.
It was then followed by a UN led Peace Walk across the NUMA NUMA TRACK starting from WAKUNAI to TOROKINA.
Reporters from New Dawn FM and the local NBC accompanied the UN team on this walk.

Ends
Caption of the March in Buka today Picture by Aloysius Laukai